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This blog will be an information outlet of sorts. A place where people can submit ideas, be informed, share their experiences and thoughts. Rants, articles, videos…all is welcome here.


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Just got suspended on twitter

for no reason. I made them over think. LMAO

do-the-dahmer:

Arturo Beltrán Leyva, the head of the Beltrán-Leyva Cartel, was shot to death on December 16, 2009 after a shootout with the Mexican Navy.

do-the-dahmer:

Arturo Beltrán Leyva, the head of the Beltrán-Leyva Cartel, was shot to death on December 16, 2009 after a shootout with the Mexican Navy.

drugwar:

Abaten a Manuel Torres Félix, apodado “El Ondeado” uno de los narcotraficantes más buscados y presunto líder del cártel de Sinaloa. En un enfrentamiento ocurrido en Culiacán, Sinaloa murió “El Ondeado”, quien presuntamente llevaba años operando en la mencionada entidad.
“Mi muerte a muchos les pesa que se agarre el gobierno que ahora si va empezar la fiesta. chino te encargo al mes cinco el apollo lo tienes de un macho… ESTOY CON MI HIJO NO LLOREN MUCHACHOS.”

drugwar:

Abaten a Manuel Torres Félix, apodado “El Ondeado” uno de los narcotraficantes más buscados y presunto líder del cártel de Sinaloa. En un enfrentamiento ocurrido en Culiacán, Sinaloa murió “El Ondeado”, quien presuntamente llevaba años operando en la mencionada entidad.

“Mi muerte a muchos les pesa que se agarre el gobierno que ahora si va empezar la fiesta. chino te encargo al mes cinco el apollo lo tienes de un macho… ESTOY CON MI HIJO NO LLOREN MUCHACHOS.”

volcanopussy:

even more from my favorite website wow go watch these awesome home movies

volcanopussy:

even more from my favorite website wow go watch these awesome home movies

newstatesman:


[A narcotic policeman organizes 3.1 tons of cocaine headed for a cartel in Mexico]
Mexico’s drug war: the battle without hope
In August, Malcolm Beith reported from Mexico. From beheadings, torture, shootings uploaded to YouTube – the “war on drugs” has ravaged the North American nation. But as the US considers treating the cartels as terrorist threats, the one solution it won’t consider is decriminalization:



The bald, middle-aged man slumps against the wall in the yard. The blood from his companion’s head splatters his shirtless chest. He looks to his left, at the headless corpse lying next to him. The chainsaw continues to roar. The bald man rests his head against the wall once again. He awaits his turn.
The horrors of Mexico’s drug war, which has raged since December 2006 and the start of President Felipe Calderón’s administration, know no bounds. More than 50,000 people have died in drug-related violence since, and there is no sign of the bloodshed diminishing. In 2006, shortly before Calderón deployed tens of thousands of soldiers to combat the violence, a group of armed thugs rolled five heads on to the dance floor of a nightclub in central Mexico as a warning; by 2007 and 2008, beheadings had become commonplace.
In 2009, a man nicknamed El Pozolero – “the stew-maker” – was arrested and confessed to dissolving the remains of more than 300 people in vats of caustic soda for a drug kingpin. Later that year, a man working for rivals of the powerful Sinaloa cartel was found; he had been beheaded and his face had been carved off and delicately stitched on to a football. Dozens of mass graves were discovered throughout the Latin American nation last year, many of them in Tamaulipas, a north-eastern state notorious for its hazy fug of lawlessness and for the terror tactics of Los Zetas, a group of former paramilitaries who now run their own drug trafficking syndicate.
Videos of some of the atrocities have been disseminated over the internet. In the most recent one, described above, members of the Sinaloa cartel are put to death.
In Mexico, and in other countries such as Guinea-Bissau and Afghanistan, the war against drug trafficking and organised crime is a fight for social and political progress – 12 years ago, Mexico became a full-fledged multiparty democracy, as the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, was ousted from 71 years of uninterrupted rule. It is also a battle to root out official corruption that for decades – in some cases, centuries – has allowed drug trafficking and other illicit activity to flourish. The violence will not end soon; even Mexican officials admit that it is unlikely the bloodshed will ebb for another six years or so, and the Mexican electorate is largely in favour of state execution for drug traffickers (polls show that about 70 per cent of Mexicans want the death penalty reinstated for narcos, as traffickers are commonly known). In July, the PRI was re-elected democratically, in spite of critics’ fears that it would again turn a blind eye to organised crime.
The drug war is also a war between rival cartels fighting for control over lucrative smuggling routes while trying to maintain their structure as the authorities crack down. The war between the Sinaloa cartel and Los Zetas – and that of the authorities against them – is a game-changer in a long, grinding process of attempting to manage drug trafficking and consumption, one that has cost US taxpayers $1trn since it was launched in 1971 by the then president, Richard Nixon.



Read this piece in full on the NS website.

newstatesman:

[A narcotic policeman organizes 3.1 tons of cocaine headed for a cartel in Mexico]

Mexico’s drug war: the battle without hope

In August, Malcolm Beith reported from Mexico. From beheadings, torture, shootings uploaded to YouTube – the “war on drugs” has ravaged the North American nation. But as the US considers treating the cartels as terrorist threats, the one solution it won’t consider is decriminalization:

The bald, middle-aged man slumps against the wall in the yard. The blood from his companion’s head splatters his shirtless chest. He looks to his left, at the headless corpse lying next to him. The chainsaw continues to roar. The bald man rests his head against the wall once again. He awaits his turn.

The horrors of Mexico’s drug war, which has raged since December 2006 and the start of President Felipe Calderón’s administration, know no bounds. More than 50,000 people have died in drug-related violence since, and there is no sign of the bloodshed diminishing. In 2006, shortly before Calderón deployed tens of thousands of soldiers to combat the violence, a group of armed thugs rolled five heads on to the dance floor of a nightclub in central Mexico as a warning; by 2007 and 2008, beheadings had become commonplace.

In 2009, a man nicknamed El Pozolero – “the stew-maker” – was arrested and confessed to dissolving the remains of more than 300 people in vats of caustic soda for a drug kingpin. Later that year, a man working for rivals of the powerful Sinaloa cartel was found; he had been beheaded and his face had been carved off and delicately stitched on to a football. Dozens of mass graves were discovered throughout the Latin American nation last year, many of them in Tamaulipas, a north-eastern state notorious for its hazy fug of lawlessness and for the terror tactics of Los Zetas, a group of former paramilitaries who now run their own drug trafficking syndicate.

Videos of some of the atrocities have been disseminated over the internet. In the most recent one, described above, members of the Sinaloa cartel are put to death.

In Mexico, and in other countries such as Guinea-Bissau and Afghanistan, the war against drug trafficking and organised crime is a fight for social and political progress – 12 years ago, Mexico became a full-fledged multiparty democracy, as the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, was ousted from 71 years of uninterrupted rule. It is also a battle to root out official corruption that for decades – in some cases, centuries – has allowed drug trafficking and other illicit activity to flourish. The violence will not end soon; even Mexican officials admit that it is unlikely the bloodshed will ebb for another six years or so, and the Mexican electorate is largely in favour of state execution for drug traffickers (polls show that about 70 per cent of Mexicans want the death penalty reinstated for narcos, as traffickers are commonly known). In July, the PRI was re-elected democratically, in spite of critics’ fears that it would again turn a blind eye to organised crime.

The drug war is also a war between rival cartels fighting for control over lucrative smuggling routes while trying to maintain their structure as the authorities crack down. The war between the Sinaloa cartel and Los Zetas – and that of the authorities against them – is a game-changer in a long, grinding process of attempting to manage drug trafficking and consumption, one that has cost US taxpayers $1trn since it was launched in 1971 by the then president, Richard Nixon.

Read this piece in full on the NS website.

trvp-thug:

Banana Clip. Straight from the rip. I’ll make that shirt say RIP.

trvp-thug:

Banana Clip. Straight from the rip. I’ll make that shirt say RIP.